Your Potential, Unlocked and Unleashed

Everything Motivational and then some

Adding the Fun Factor to Your Corporate Event

Image credit: Mosman Library (flickr.com)

                                               Image credit: Mosman Library (flickr.com)

There is absolutely no question about it. Planning and organizing corporate events is never a task for the faint of heart! This involves a lot of work ranging from brainstorming and researching, to contacting venues, reserving food, and many others. To put it simply, it can be time-consuming.

Of course, you need to explore the best ideas if you want your event to be extra special, fun, and memorable. Also, you have to be wise in the way you manage the allotted budget so you can avoid overspending. You want to get your money’s worth and achieve your purpose at the same time.

However, this is not to say that you should be stingy when it comes to spending a portion of your budget to important aspects that contribute to the success of your occasion. A common mistake among corporate event planners is that they give much attention to entertainment and only spend minimally for it. This is, like I said, a mistake – and one that you can’t afford to make. Remember that many, if not all, participants are most eager about an event’s entertainment portion.

Lead engaging activities and games to make your event lively. Everyone loves prizes so prepare small tokens to further enhance participation. Hire a professional MC (Master of Ceremony) who can handle the job well. Do not settle for your company’s funny guy to do this task. Remember that standing in front of a crowd and handling a program takes skill and experience and not anyone can do that. Get a band for the after-event party.

Also, why not consider inviting a celebrity as one of your speakers in the event? Jean Kittson is someone who has the talents to entertain and inspire people at the same time. Although mostly known for her comedic roles in TV and film, Jean is likewise a renowned columnist for various newspapers and magazines. She has also written her own books (“Tounge Lashing” and “You’re Still Hot to Me: The Joys of Menopause”). On top of that, she is also an eager advocate of women’s health as a founding member and ambassador of different groups. Using her trademark charm, humor and wit, Jean can brighten up any event she gets invited in. For other popular entertainment speakers, feel free to browse PlatinumSpeakers’ official website.

Consider these simple suggestions and you’ll see that adding the fun factor to your corporate event is truly not an impossible goal.

Adding the Fun Factor to Your Corporate Event

Image credit: Mosman Library (flickr.com)

                                               Image credit: Mosman Library (flickr.com)

There is absolutely no question about it. Planning and organizing corporate events is never a task for the faint of heart! This involves a lot of work ranging from brainstorming and researching, to contacting venues, reserving food, and many others. To put it simply, it can be time-consuming.

Of course, you need to explore the best ideas if you want your event to be extra special, fun, and memorable. Also, you have to be wise in the way you manage the allotted budget so you can avoid overspending. You want to get your money’s worth and achieve your purpose at the same time.

However, this is not to say that you should be stingy when it comes to spending a portion of your budget to important aspects that contribute to the success of your occasion. A common mistake among corporate event planners is that they give much attention to entertainment and only spend minimally for it. This is, like I said, a mistake – and one that you can’t afford to make. Remember that many, if not all, participants are most eager about an event’s entertainment portion.

Lead engaging activities and games to make your event lively. Everyone loves prizes so prepare small tokens to further enhance participation. Hire a professional MC (Master of Ceremony) who can handle the job well. Do not settle for your company’s funny guy to do this task. Remember that standing in front of a crowd and handling a program takes skill and experience and not anyone can do that. Get a band for the after-event party.

Also, why not consider inviting a celebrity as one of your speakers in the event? Jean Kittson is someone who has the talents to entertain and inspire people at the same time. Although mostly known for her comedic roles in TV and film, Jean is likewise a renowned columnist for various newspapers and magazines. She has also written her own books (“Tounge Lashing” and “You’re Still Hot to Me: The Joys of Menopause”). On top of that, she is also an eager advocate of women’s health as a founding member and ambassador of different groups. Using her trademark charm, humor and wit, Jean can brighten up any event she gets invited in. For other popular entertainment speakers, feel free to browse PlatinumSpeakers’ official website.

Consider these simple suggestions and you’ll see that adding the fun factor to your corporate event is truly not an impossible goal.

Speaker Feature: Jessica Watson

Image credit: Andrew Fraser (commons.wikimedia.org)

Image credit: Andrew Fraser (commons.wikimedia.org)

“You don’t have to be someone special or anything special to achieve something amazing. You’ve just got to have a dream, believe in it and work hard.”

Those are the inspiring words of Jessica Watson, a girl who achieved worldwide popularity after successfully going on an around-the-world voyage on her own. She currently holds the record of being the youngest person to circumnavigate the globe without any outside assistance at all.

People everywhere were captivated not only by this impressive and mind-blowing achievement but also with her naturally winsome smile. On May 15, 2010, Jessica arrived at the Sydney Harbour foreshore and was given a grand welcome a huge crowd, Australia’s Prime Minister and her overjoyed parents who were really glad to have her back after 201 days of sailing. The feat she just completed was definitely admirable and moving!

Not to mention that looking at Jessica’s personal history gives anyone a sense of greater appreciation for the girl. You have to know that Jessica struggled with dyslexia when she was younger. As such, common tasks such as reading and writing were very difficult for her. She also had a hard time learning to ride a bike and plus ball sports were next to impossible.

Perhaps we can say the proverbial bulb started to light up for her when she was 11 years old. It was the time when she and her family were living on a boat. Julie, her mother, read her Lionheart: A Journey of the Human Spirit which tells the story of 19-year-old Australian sailor named Jesse Martin who at the time was the youngest person to circumnavigate the world without assistance. Jessica was simply motivated by that and thought she can also do it.

By the time she reached 13, she began her preparations by learning and sailing every chance she got. Don McIntyre, an adventurer, donated a 34-feet boat for Jessica which was later painted pink and given the name Ella’s Pink Lady (named after one of the sponsors that supported her).

Despite all the difficulties she experienced (such as encountering a collision which damaged her yacht), Jessica was persistent and did her best. She successfully fulfilled her dream and returned home in Australia several days before she turned 17 thus, breaking Jesse Martin’s record.

She was given the “Young Australian of the Year” award in 2011 and the “Medal of the Order of Australia” in 2012. Her story has inspired millions and an upcoming movie called “True Spirit” based on her experiences will be released come 2015.

Learn more by reading Jessica Watson biography at PlatinumSpeakers website.

The Power of Visualization in Self-Motivation

Photo Credit: XPRIZE Foundation (Flickr.com)

                      Photo Credit: XPRIZE Foundation (Flickr.com)

In all the aspects involved in self-motivation, visualization is perhaps the most powerful. It is the element that bridges the gap between setting your goals and achieving them. Without visualization, there is no way you can make your dreams become reality.

The main reason that visualization is very powerful lies on how the human body operates. Science as well as religion tells us that the human body is composed of three parts: soul, mind, and body. Sigmund Freud may refer to these three as Id, Ego, and Super ego and a process known as Transaction Analysis may use the parent, adult, and child analogy, but in the end, it all means the same thing – man is one-third mind.

Among the three parts that make up a man, it is the mind that has the most potential to affect man’s actions and emotions. The mind is where you converse with yourself and that conversation doesn’t stop. Even in your sleep, you see pictures in the form of dreams. In short, the mind is very powerful. If you want things to happen in your life the way you want them to, you need to learn how to harness the power of your mind. One way you can do that is through visualization.

Visualization only becomes effective, however, if the pictures you put in your mind and focus on are pictures that are brought about by your life purpose. For this reason, it is crucial that you first determine what you really want to do with your life before you even exert any effort into fixing your thoughts into it. Your passion is what will fuel your goals and what will make visualization very effective.

Visualization comes in several different forms. You can visualize through meditation, creating pictures of your goals in your mind and focusing on them. You can also visualize through drawing, painting, or writing. Mindmapping is one example of this. If you have goals in your life you want to achieve, for instance, you can write them down on a piece of paper. You can also make a collage of pictures that represent your goals in life. If your goal is to have your own house and car in the near future, you can cut out pictures of these items from magazines and make a collage out of them. Visualization also becomes more effective if you make it a part of your daily life. Practice visualization until it becomes a habit.

Getting inspiration from speakers like Billy Brownless or Jean Kittson is a good idea to stay motivated in life. However, there is power to self-motivation that you cannot get from simply listening to other people’s stories. Learn to motivate yourself and learn how to harness the power of visualization and you will find yourself motivated at all times.

Speaker Feature: Ange Postecoglou

ange postecoglou

Image credit: PlantinumSpeakers.com.au

Ange Postecoglou is a well-respected soccer icon in Australia. Born in Athens, Greece, he emigrated and grew up in Melbourne, Victoria when he was just 5 years old.

He first played for South Melbourne team in the National Soccer League where he eventually became captain and coach. He also had the chance to represent the country on various occasions, even playing as a youth representative back in 1985. As the South Melbourne coach, the team got two consecutive National Soccer League victories. They also won the 1999 Oceania Club Championship which led to the much-coveted opportunity to play at FIFA Club World Championship. Eventually, he was picked to be the coach for the Australian youth team.

In 2000, Ange was appointed as coach of the country’s youth sides. A huge part of his work involved identifying and developing new players, which he finds to be an exciting task.

2009 marked his return to the soccer fields as he was assigned to replace Frank Farina as the coach for Brisbane Roar. Some of his first moves were controversial as he removed some team members and recruited new ones. Although critics were quick to show disapproval, he asked them to reserve their judgment until after a year since he began as the new coach. All criticisms were silenced when the team had a streak of remarkable wins and showed a unique style of playing the sport. Fans and sports experts eventually referred to the team as “Roarcelona” as the team won most matches they played.

In 2012, he officially became the head coach for Melbourne Victory and eventually as head coach of Australia in 2013. He is also known for his work in the media as a sports analyst for Fox Sports as well as contributor for Offsiders. He also runs a regular column in the Courier Mail.

Ange is also a favorite keynote speaker for various occasions ranging from corporate events, school functions, and many others. With his amazing experiences in the soccer field as player and coach, he really has much to say when it comes to the power of persistence and motivation, importance of teamwork, handling changes, stepping outside the comfort zone, leadership, and many more. His insights are very much applicable in a wide array of settings, perhaps as much in the sports industry as in the business industry as well. Ange Postecoglou continues to be invited within Australia and elsewhere to deliver presentations.

Speaker Feature: Peter Fitzsimons

8451349733_bb71c7c8eb

Image credit: Mosman Library (flickr.com)

Peter Fitzsimons’ name first catapulted to popularity when he played as a rugby player in Australia. He began his career as a professional athlete way back the 80s and guess what? He never stopped there.

The guy seemed to have a knack for redefining himself, as if consciously trying to avoid becoming forever labeled as “merely” someone who plays rugby.

In 1988, he began to explore the world of journalism as he became a regular columnist for The Sydney Morning Herald and eventually on the Sun-Herald. His column is called “The Fitz Files” and that’s where he shares his insights about all things sports-related. He has often been touted as “Australia’s finest sports journalist.”

In 2006, radio listeners got the chance to hear Peter’s voice every morning as he began to be the co-host of a breakfast program with Mike Carlton. Broadcasted via Radio 2UE, the Mike and Fitz Breakfast Show immediately became a massive hit among audiences. He did the gig for 2 years and left afterwards so he can focus more on writing.

This step proved to be a wise one as Peter eventually managed to write great books. Some of the popular titles he penned include Kokoda, a book that tells about the battles between Australia and Japanese forces during World War II and Torbuk, a tale about the Rats of Torbuk as they battle against Italian troops and Afrika Troops under the leadership of General Erwin Rommel. Kokoda and Torbuk were both received by fans and critics alike and respectively sold more than 270,000 and 150,000 copies respectively.

He has written biographic masterpieces for renowned aviator Charles Kingsford Smith (“Charles Kingsford Smith and Those Magnificent Man”), Ned Kelly (“Ned Kelly: The Story of Australia’s Most Notorious Legend”), Kim Beazley (“Beazley: A Biography”), Steve Waugh (“Steve Waugh”), and Les Darcy (“The Ballad of Les Darcy”) among many others. He also wrote A Simpler Time: A Memoir of Love, Laughter, Loss and Billycarts which is about his own childhood. He has authored more than 20 books and is considered as one of the best-selling non-fiction writers in Australia.

Peter is also successful as a motivational speaker, being invited by many companies and organizations to share some words of wisdom. With his valuable knowledge, offbeat humor and extensive experience, he manages to deliver powerful messages that leave positive impressions to those who take the time to listen.

If you are interested to book him for your event, you can always contact Peter Fitzsimons online.

From “Be Good” to “Get Better”: Changing Mindset at Work

In my previous posts, I often discuss all about public speaking, from how you can improve as a speaker, to some notable keynote and motivational speakers I had the chance of knowing about. This time, though, I’d like to share something about workplace motivation and changing mindset at work. This is in line with my recent post: 4 Scientific Ways to Motivate People.

I’ll be sharing here a video I found online. Just a quick info about the presenter in the video. She’s Heidi Grant Halvorson, a motivational psychologist and researcher. She is the Associate Director of the Motivation Science Center at the Columbia Business School, and author of some best-selling books. Basically, she’s a social psychologist who researches, writes, and speaks about the science of motivation.

On to the video presentation, we tend to think of things to be all about acquiring the right technical skills or attitude to complete our responsibilities. While this mindset is good to some extent, it’s also important that we tend to our creative mind soil, so that we don’t just do what we need to do. We can also improve our work to be more successful in it, and at the same time really enjoy what we do. This can help us handle diversity well and be more interested in our work, despite the setbacks and challenges, and be able to move on easily in case of changes.

To be able to achieve this, you need to have the right mindset. Heidi talked about the 2 mindsets that a lot of researches have been studying for a long while. First off, we usually have this mindset to be good at everything. It’s like we’re out to prove our superiority to others, we always strive to compete with others’ skills to prove our worth. I guess a lot of us are like this, but unfortunately according to Heidi, this mindset tends to hold us back. Statistics say that this kind of mindset hinders our ability to be fully successful and to enjoy what we do and to handle stress and change effectively. The be good mindset involves always trying to prove yourself to everyone through the things you do. It’s like showing off all the skills that you have. It also involves always comparing yourself to others, that you should perform better than others — though we may think of this unconsciously. This mindset can backfire in the end because if you fail in one of your goals or you perform poorly in comparison to others, you tend to blame it all on your skills. It’s like seeing yourself as not good enough, that’s why you failed. If we constantly think that everything is a test of our ability or our skills, this tends to stress us much in the process. It also sets a pattern of vulnerability as soon as we start doubting our skills when we perform poorly.

Heidi recommends an alternative mindset, embracing the Get Better thinking. In this mindset, it won’t be about getting good, but it will be about getting better. So for instance, instead of proving your skills, you focus more on improving yourself. Then instead of trying to outperform others, the more important thing to think about is “are you performing better than you did in the past?”

I really recommend you look into the video and let me know what you think. It’s a good way of assessing your current mindset in work right now (and even in life) and making changes on your beliefs. If you want other leadership and motivational stories, you can also check out Ben Roberts-Smith biography online. He’s a popular leadership and inspirational speaker in Australia who uses real life examples of his experience in the Australian Regular Army. He often connects his warfare experiences to team building and goal setting in the workplace.

Video credit: Heidi Grant Halvorson: The Incredible Benefits of a “Get Better” Mindset

4 Scientific Ways to Motivate People

Photo Credit: photosteve101 (Flickr.com)

                         Photo Credit: photosteve101 (Flickr.com)

The ability to motivate is one that every leader desires to possess. In fact, you can’t be a truly great leader if you don’t know how to motivate the people you are trying to lead. Inspirational presenters and motivational speakers such as Afterburner speaker understand this and that is the secret to their successes. If you want to be a successful leader yourself, you also need to have the ability to encourage your subordinate without having to nag them. The good news is there are four steps backed up by science that you can take to achieve it.

Don’t Bribe

Rewards are definitely great motivators and they do work. The only problem with this equation is that once the rewards stop, the motivation also stops. This is especially true if you are trying to motivate artists or people whose line of work involves out-of-the-box thinking. I’m not saying you shouldn’t pay people. However, you should only pay them just enough to take monetary issue out of the way. Here’s a bonus: If people love what they are doing, they will never stop doing it even if they know they won’t get anything from it. That’s passion.

Encourage Emotion

Speaking of passion, a good alternative to giving rewards is to encourage emotion among your subordinates. Feelings are a good motivator. It’s hard to do something if you are not feeling anything. It’s possible that you would do it, but the results will obviously half-hearted or mediocre. On the contrary, if your emotions are focused on something that you doing, you will produce results that are more than what is expected of you. That leads us to the next step, highlighting progress.

Highlight Progress

Nothing can be more motivating than progress. According to the book “The One Minute Manager” the best way to encourage people is to catch them doing good and then praising them for it. It doesn’t have to be a big success. It can be a minor progress, but if you emphasize these little progresses, your actions will eventually ignite something in the person’s inner work life. Praise is very powerful. Encourage your members to reflect regularly on the good work they have accomplished and how far they have come.

Tell a Story

It may seem simple, but storytelling is a talent. It is what marketers usually use. In Seth Godin’s book “All Marketers are Liars” he explains that before consumers can buy from you, you first need to tell them a story that fits their worldview. A similar principle applies in leadership and motivation, but the only difference is that you tell your subordinates a story that fits both your worldview and theirs. Stories that you tell the people you are leading are some of your most powerful leadership arsenals. Craft a good story that will encourage unity among between you and your people. This is what cult leaders do. Not that all cults are good, but you get the idea. 

Public Speaking: The Art of Presence

It’s obvious that public speaking requires your physical presence, but a lot of times, we can stand on the podium or on the stage in front of people without being really there. This is the main reason why a speech or a presentation fails to be effective. If you wish that your message get into the heart of your audience, you need to practice the art presence in public speaking.

Photo Credit: Nan Palmero (Flickr.com)

Photo Credit: Nan Palmero (Flickr.com)

Focus

Staying anchored to your audience is what focus in public speaking means. This involves turning your attention towards each and every individual in the room, and having a mindset that each of the people you are speaking to is important. Focus also means being anchored to the message you are delivering. You can deliver an eloquent speech, but if you are not sure what the purpose of the message is, your audience will easily forget the words they heard you speak even before they reach the exit. To focus on your message is to ask yourself why you are sharing it in the first place. It also means asking yourself what value your message contains that it has to be shared to the audience. When you pay attention to these details, you’ll get the attention of your audience and you’ll get your message across with effectiveness.

Engagement

Stage fright is usually a result of self-preoccupation. When you are focused on yourself rather than you audience, when you are conscious that you are going to make a mistake, you are basically turning your arrow of awareness towards yourself. This leads you to commit more errors, forgetting lines, and eventually not getting your message across. The most experienced and effective public speakers understand this and do their best to ground themselves both internally (focusing on themselves) and externally (focusing on the audience). This way, both the audience and themselves are receiving something from the message.

Being

Public speakers often struggle between actively doing something and simply being themselves. One secret to mastering the art of presence in public speaking is to think of speaking as simply and opportunity to engage with your audience without having to do anything. This may not be appropriate for every situation, but more often than not, you’ll find yourself doing what needs to be done if you first decide that public speaking is not a performance.

One of the personalities I love who has mastered the art of presence in public speaking is Sam Kekovich. Just who is Sam Kekovich you ask? Visit PlatinumSpeakers website today and you will find out.

Meanwhile, try to keep in mind these three things in mind when preparing yourself for your next presentation. Master the art and you will find yourself and your message much more present and engaging.

The 5 Greatest Motivational Speeches Of All Time


We all need spiritual boosts every now and then and this is where a motivational speaker, maybe the likes of Nick Farr-Jones, enters the frame. An effective motivation speaker will stir the hearts of the audience, embolden them to keep up the fight and have faith in themselves. So for those who are learning the art of motivating other or if you’re just someone looking to be motivated, here are the ten best motivational speeches that’s ever been said:

  1. Everybody’s Free To Wear Sunscreen by Baz Luhrmann, 1999
    This is a personal favorite whose lessons I have always carried with me. The speech teaches us to remember the small details of our lives like singing, flossing and wearing sunscreen but it is so much more.
    Excerpt: “Get plenty of calcium. Be kind to your knees, you’ll miss them when they’re gone. Maybe you’ll marry, maybe you won’t, maybe you’ll have children, maybe you won’t, maybe you’ll divorce at 40, maybe you’ll dance the funky chicken on your 75th wedding anniversary. Whatever you do, don’t congratulate yourself too much or berate yourself, either. Your choices are half chance, so are everybody else’s.”
  2. Stanford University Commencement Address  by Steve Jobs, 2005
    The legendary Steve Jobs couldn’t have said it any better.
    Excerpt: “Don’t let the noise of others’ opinions drown out your own inner voice. And most important, have the courage to follow your heart and intuition. They somehow already know what you truly want to become. Everything else is secondary. ”
  3. Don’t Give Up Speech by Jim Valvano, 1993
    Jim Valvano was a basketball coach made famous by his touching speech which he gave eight weeks before he died of cancer.
    Excerpt: ”To me, there are three things we all should do every day. We should do this every day of our lives. Number one is laugh. You should laugh every day. Number two is think. You should spend some time in thought. Number three is, you should have your emotions moved to tears, could be happiness or joy. But think about it. If you laugh, you think, and you cry, that’s a full day. That’s a heck of a day. You do that seven days a week, you’re going to have something special.”
  4. Achieving Your Childhood Dreams by Randy Pausch, 2007
    Professor Randy Pausch made all his childhood dreams come true, no matter–how crazy they were—and he tells in his inspirational speech how.
    Excerpt: “Anything is possible, and that’s something we should not lose sight of. The inspiration and the permission to dream is huge.”
  5. Harvard Commencement Speech by JK Rowling, 2008
    Before JK Rowling had the immense success that she does now, she went through some failures and trails just like all of us but in this speech, she urges us not to be afraid of failure, but instead to always work around it.
    Excerpt: “You might never fail on the scale I did, but some failure in life is inevitable. It is impossible to live without failing at something, unless you live so cautiously that you might as well not have lived at all – in which case, you fail by default.”
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.